About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
compromise. in november 1860 after his election, the country was gripped because many southerners felt in the republican party, the republican party was in northern party and proudly so. they did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral vote without any of the southern states. the first time in the nations history, a party without any notable southern components would be taking over the executive branch of the national government. but there was more. the republican party was probably a northern party. during its existence in the mid-1850s, the rhetoric had assaulted the south and racial slavery, their determination -- the republicans determination, were to win a national election without any southern support and republicans repeatedly condemned this undemocratically, even on american way. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, seven radicals, those people who preached the gospel of the union, they took to the public platform and newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had act immedi
to call. we do not expect to witness an election won by a landslide. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson readily beat barry goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a pitted battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country, with the winner walking off with a modest majority. there is customary wisdom, a campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term versus the unknow
you actually think that the people iran in 2010 and got elected or for that matter the people iran before and have now ascended to positions believe that no is a solution or that they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> well, again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshmen, the so-called deep party class of the 100th of congress, i think their belief is that they are doing precisely what the people who elected them with some do which was several back all obama initiatives, to cut spending, a lot of them doubt that the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances, and to that degree they feel like that was a failure. but, no, they basically believe that their job is first to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place to pass those initiatives that create a better business climate, more and more deregulation, the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes. i think that they do believe. and, of course, after you flash toward a bit, i expect to will talks about the de
out before the election. i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioner and a start with ratio demagoguery when every police shooting where the black kid was treated suddenly the klan had taken over the police force. they are finn natgas of various poses and mike trayvon martin they just dusts -- disappear with the facts came out you never see the final article attention readers, that story we have been hysterical about. [laughter] actually he was muddying the copper ore he did ambush because they would disappear from the news. one of the best of my coat was called to become artist it takes a dozen cops to subdue him two weeks later he was in a comment if he dies of pneumonia say they he died as a result of police brutality. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter and are acquitted the "new york times" the editorial was remembering my goal that no justice could be done now flashed to the rosenbaum case with all sharpton who has many cameo appearances. i have forgotten everything he was involved in. [laughter] and once put on trial and there was sick a
a low profile. sheraton did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed to elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. to the governor's of louisiana and texas. there indian warrior slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. it was here he began prosecuting with brutal effect for the decorate that -- strategy he implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of total war. as waged in the shenandoah valley. it was a milder form of the cruder -- they were in agreement that in inflicting suffering on southern civilians would more quickly end the bloodshed. in urging sheraton to conduct the war in the shenandoah, if the war is to last another year, we the valley to remain barren waste. he a barn full of wheat i would rather sooner lose the barn and wheat than my son. unlike the broader sill burning as it was called horrified and bittered valley residences. one described how the innovators came up the valley sweeping everything before them like a hurricane. there's nothing left from the horse down to the chick. en. raid the new settlement on the plain
. actually, during the summer of 1992, as the political season was heating up before the election, nixon and i had both heard some strange clicking sounds on his telephone. and he said, "you know, the phone may be tapped." and i said, "well, it certainly could be." and he said, "well, let's try a little experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it.
in the election of 1964. johnson listens to this, and he says very somberly, dick, if that is the price for the spell, i will gladly pay it. a remarkable story of hers. if i may just help one more quick story about his loyalty. as harry knows, he was fiercely loyal to those who worked with him. when the staff was leaving the white house in 1959 and they were going back and finding jobs, lbj wanted to make sure that everybody landed in a good job. transitioning with good prospects. there was one guy who worked as a legal counsel for lbj. he signed out of the white house in order to go to los angeles to talk about starting a washington office for this prosperous firm. the new that he had signed out in order to take this interview. going to los angeles, he meets with the partners of this law firm in a conference room and they are all hundred together. they are very frustrated and one partner says, okay, you take a call from the president. they all leave and pearson gets on the phone. and he says, i don't know if you noticed, but i signed out of the white house and i'm in los angeles. lbj s
willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is
them to young or not. they bickered about the process of holding elections in the territory. they argued about it recently conducted census. babbitt, rather up wisely, took issue with young's conduct of such matters, and by the end of the meeting, young unloaded his fury on babbitt. this is what he said. if you interfere with any of my dictations in the election, it will be the last time. now, i don't want to hear you say this is not right and that is not right. you are nothing but a stinking politician. i know more about sound questions and doctrine and laws than you. i am not willing to suffer this people to be interrupted. you are rotten now with gentilism. the lord only knows what. i despise it as i despise the gates of hell. you ought to say mormonism is my controller. my governorship and everything else is to bow down to mormonism. it wouldn't have been really all that remarkable for brigham young to have browbeaten a fellow church member who was, perhaps, not acting in the church's best interest, but young had a larger purpose in mind. he delivered this harangue in th
by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david
the democratic party to the south. you may well lose the presidency in the election of 1964. johnson listens to this, and he says very somberly, dick, if that is the price for the spell, i will gladly pay it. a remarkable story of hers. if i may just help one more quick story about his loyalty. as harry knows, he was fiercely loyal to those who worked with him. when the staff was leaving the white house in 1959 and they were going back and finding jobs, lbj wanted to make sure that everybody landed in a good job. transitioning with good prospects. there was one guy who worked as a legal counsel for lbj. he signed out of the white house in order to go to los angeles to talk about starting a washington office for this prosperous firm. the new that he had signed out in order to take this interview. going to los angeles, he meets with the partners of this law firm in a conference room and they are all hundred together. they are very frustrated and one partner says, okay, you take a call from the president. they all leave and pearson gets on the phone. and he says, i don't know if you noticed, bu
about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election, not if he had won it. that's the level of national security we're talking about here. >> harvard business school professor profiles historic and
the 1930's. >>host: the 2012 election? >> at one to talk about that. i am tired of 2012. talk about the future. that was not good. we have to figure out to appeal to a bigger electorate. >> rerunning for president? >> that is classified. it is too early to make that decision. >>host: government believes. >> as part of the university's serious we visit campuses across the country talking to professors or authors we're at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis merrill lynch. with professor aaron o'connell also the author of this book "underdogs" the making of the modern marine corps." professor when was the marine corps established? >> 1775 but the birthday is us mess. the record always claims november but that is the date that congress authorized but they never raised the battalion raised then. >> day never were. but the first goes then 28 november but 10 november still celebrated as a birthday. >>host: what was the purpose of the marine corps? >> to be the guard on a ship to protect the officers from
them over to young or not. they bickered about the process of holding elections in a territory. they argued about it recently -- babette rather unwisely took issue with young's conduct of such matters and by the end of the meeting, brigham young unloaded his fury on babbitt. this is what he said. if you interfere with any of my dissertation in the election, it will be the last time. now i don't want to hear you say this is not right and that is not right. you are nothing but a stinking politician. i know more about sound questions in doctrine and law then you. i am not willing to suffer to be interrupted. you are rotten now was gentileism and the lord only knows what. as i despise the gates of hell, you ought to say that mormonism is my comptroller. my governorship and everything else is to bow down to mormonism. it would not have been really all that remarkable for brigham young to have browbeaten a fellow church member who was perhaps not acting in the church's best interest but young had a larger purpose in mind. he delivered this harangue in the presence of the territory's
elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefront of all of those issues and his own politics national defence, a staunch anti-communist that set an important goal in the right wing anticommunist politics in the 1960's one of the things that led the party is in 1964. even the early in his career he was a staunch advocate of the unions in south carolina back in the 3
elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. city alderman, governors of louisiana and texas. consequently, president johnson removed sheridan as military governor. he was transferred to the west to command the district encompassing the southern great plains. they are, indian warrior bands were slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. and it was here that sheridan begin prosecuting with brutal effectiveness, a strategy that implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of cold war. as wage in the shenandoah valley was a milder form that did not distinguish between soldiers and civilians. by 1864, lincoln, grant, sheridan and sherman were in agreement that inflicting suffering on seven civilians would more quickly and the bloodshed. and urging shared into conduct the cold war and the shinto, grant wrote him if the war is to last another year, we want the shenandoah valley to remain a barren waste. sheridan believed it was more merciful to destroy property and to kill southern men. he wrote, if i had a barn full of weeds and enhance them,
and people demonstrations and even cross vote districts to get people elected, and i found a tape where they are basically saying, yes, you helped me get elected, and, therefore, i'm going to make you the head of the housing authority, which he did. you are right that when these allegations of physical abuse and financial misdeeds happened, the slate that he helped elect, you know, the district attorney, counsel member harvey, they turned a blind eye to it. you are right. of course, they were killed about ten days after the massacre happened. you had angela davis -- you know, on the outside, people's temple looked good. i talk about in the prologue, for me, growing up as i did with a black brother, looking for a place to belong, if i came to a temperature l service on a sunday morning and seen this, i would have definitely had been interested. my brother, david, and i, i would have been interested because of his message of social justice. i would have been interested because there was real love between temple members. i mean, having grown up in the qhurnlg, a church is -- church, a chur
and run amok and it has become of bully. >>host: november 2012 what did those elections clarify? >>guest: lot that we need to do something to grow as as a party and are in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we cannot figure out what they want in doing gland and around the great lakes purposely cannot figure out what they want we will not win as a party. i think they are conservative and we should balance the budget but they don't think we should be at war all the time. say one more tolerance to put people in prison for possession of marijuana comment to see more local judges, less present time. i am not encouraging people to use marijuana but don't think they should be in jail for it either. >>host: we did a long interview on your first book you can see that on book tv's.org. the premise? >> the tea party goes to washington and. with the tea party movement probably the biggest happen in 40 years. hundreds of thousands of people were showing up and it transformed the way we think that people began to question the law that was passed as obamacare
already enrolled me in band and it wasn't something they chose. they put me there. it was an elective. which i didn't elect. i was lucky to have been put in that class because when i walked in there and the teacher said, which instrument do you want to play? and i first i thought i had to pay for them. i say how much does it cost? and when he said it doesn't cost you anything, it just seemed like the whole world opened up to me. and i got to choose whichever instrument i wanted. i saw the sax is a phone it's the one i wanted. >> do you play it today? >> i i don't play anymore and i haven't since i graduated from pass deana city college. i never owned my own. they didn't have marring band. i didn't have anything to join. and then i discovered a whole bunch of other things, i got in to dance, i got in to filming video and all the other things i was doing and i really missed the instrument. i wanted to get back in to plying, ab then one of my teachers pulled my aside one day and she said, it's god that you're creative and you love to explore and learn new things, but you need to choose o
in band. it wasn't something that i chose. they put me there. it was an elective, which i didn't elect, but i was so lucky to have been put in that class because when i walked in there and the teacher said, which instrument do you want to play, and at first i thought i had to pay for them and i say, how much does it cost? and when he said it doesn't cost you anything. it just seemed like the whole world just opened up to me, and i can to choose whichever i wanted and i saw the saxophone and it was so beautiful, and that's the one i wanted. >> do you still played today? >> i don't play anymore, and i haven't played since i graduated from college because i never owned my own saxophone. when i went to you see, they didn't have marching band so i didn't have anything to join. and then i discovered a whole bunch of other things, you know, i got into dance, into film and video. i got into like all these other things that i was doing, and i really missed the saxophone and a wanted to get back into playing. and one of my teachers pulled inside one day, and she said you know, it's really good y
that when he was, i think, very prematurely awarded the nobel peace prize being elected president, he shows up at oslow before the nobel peace committee and delivers what i think is probably the only pro-war speech ever given in acceptance of the nobel peace prize. he argues for the necessity of war, but argues for the necessity of american power and for his responsibility to use american power in the world. i think that was a fairly remarkable speech. that coupled with the fact that there is the remote targeting of suspected terrorists says to me that people's expectations about him as a sort of passist leaning president was misguided. he's clearly not that, and nothing shows that more than his decision to go after bin laden. now, when i talk about main characters in the story, forgive me, because i don't think about these things in the way scholars do or maybe that you would doing an analysis for the military. i'm a story teller. to me, i'm interested in the arc of characters in the story. you've got admiral in a wheelchair, months after 9/11, who gets an opportunity to work in the white
a bully. someone has to stand up to a bully. >> november 2012, post-election. the 2012 elections clarify for you? >> well, that we as republicans need to do something to grow as a party. we are in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we don't figure out what people want out on the west coast, new england, around the great lakes. solid blue. and so we figure out what people want we're not the right to win again as a party. >> what do you think they want. >> i think they are conservative. they think we should balance our budget, but i also think they don't think we should be at war everywhere all the time. the one little more tolerance in policy as far as putting people in prison for possession of marijuana. think it would like to see more local judges take care of that, less prison time. i'm not in favor of encouraging people to use marijuana, but i also don't think we should be putting people in jail for another. >> this is your second book. redid along former interview on your first book. you can watch that at booktv.org. the premise of that first book. >> the first book was the tea party g
of the big three automakers, tough call. by the way, i don't know why anyone in this presidential election mentions that this is a bush program. i have a chapter about left, right forward. we need to at least get history rate. continue to the other, that's not what it is about either. but what would've happened if we would've let it go? would've been all this manufacturing access, contracts out the door. skill itself by factory at 10 activist resources? what would happen if we had the courage to do that? again, i think he would've been a big risk. but it would've been exciting. it either been a great thing for american auto workers. poster we are talking with philip auerswald, professor here at george mason university. his most recent book, "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he also served as an adviser to the clinton global initiative. what do you advise on? >> guest: while clutching a knack for asking me that question. purchased at the global initiative the last three days and i've been working with them for the last three years. the reason i
and abolish the electoral college, replacing it with direct election of the president was killed in the senate in 1979, but the issue rears its head every four years when people look around and wonder why america needs this antiquated contraption. and, unfortunately, i was looking in here for the name of the book. two people have no ask you. what about posting that on your website? >> if you don't mind my looking i can look in -- i think i have my book right here. perhaps i can come up with it. i believe it is called, how democratic is the american constitution? the author is a yale scholar, and i think, you know, i am under tv lights for too long. my brain is not coming up as something of a measly much better producing. >> host: okay. we are almost out of time anyway. if i give you 30 seconds to answer this question, and that's not very fair. there was an e-mail here that i wanted to finish with. and unfortunately, no i have put it under one of your books. i haven't read here. this is from allison in norman, oklahoma. when i was in elementary school in the 1950's, each classroom displayed a w
. to me, the real danger is if the romney gets elected, they might actually do what they say they might do. >> that is remarkable feature of the political environment pitcher best hope is one of the candidates is that line carries teeth. >> we sit now in what feels like prolonged stagnation. joe, you've written a book on inequality. this could not be a positive development for the distribution proceeds to have the called the reserve army of the unemployed driving wages down, weakening the bargaining power. >> inequality has become a serious problem in the united states. it is interesting while polls are arguing in a good a long time, it gotten so serious that even economists realize it's a serious problem. when they say serious problem coming got to believe it. not our colleagues. but the magazine's economists. >> it's my job to take them on. you guys take on the magazine. one of the reasons that it weakens the economy, you know, paul emphasized the problem right now is lots of demand, lack of total demand that means people are not buying as many goods in the economy and capacity to produc
of these women will be available behind the election of your to sign copies of their buck. reminder on all those fronts. let me introduce three incredible women. 1985 to 1991, governor of vermont. later united states ambassador both of switzerland and liechtenstein and is author of this book, the new feminist agenda. then professor anita hill, a professor of social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis university and author of this new book, rematching equality, stories of gender, race, and finding a home. welcome. [applause] and senior editor at the atlantic and founder of women section. also the author of the end of man and the rise of women. so we start off with a couple minutes from each of you on -- a brief summary or a story from your book that you think best encapsulates the ideas that you are presenting. >> thank you very much. it is great to see you all up there and to be here with my sister authoress. what is next for women. my career, my political life really started with the woman's movement in the 70's. and we had great expectations, some of which have been at. the very fact
after the 2010 election. when the republicans and tea party knocked barack obama for a loop taking control of the house. the tax cut deal, fights over the budget, the debt ceiling, deficit reduction, egypt, libya, and how obama's made the decision and took the actions he to go up but to explain how this is done to set up the 2012 campaign. he had a theory he could make the 2012 race a choice between different approaches to government and everything he did he tried to temper temper -- to other at to a choice. we did not know how things would end up on 2012 but i looked at his governing and elected strategy and it culminated. this is the back story of what happened in the presidential campaign. >> host: david corn. showdown is his most recent book that the national press club >> host: professor, we are here to talk about your book indispensable. i want to say this is a delightful book to read. you deal with very familiar figures. you attack them from some new angles. let's died 10. you have a quote but is attributed to different people also charles de gaulle is most often accredited.
that existed between the u.s. and peru since the election to power there. the main newspaper in lima noted profound significance of the passion. the human warmth, this is gone the norm of international courtesy. they appreciated the using and concern that she demonstrated in the senior sorrow. on the departure she was awarded the grand cross of the order of the son. even "the washington post which rarely had much positive to say admitted he had threaded her way among potential sources of trouble with skill. epitomizing the simple human response required by the tragedy the editorial continued she exceeded in communicating to the peeve began she met a desire to help. and do so with a great task for which she deserved much credit. if the trip to peru shows a potential for her to serve as good will pass. ambassador the trip to africa the following year showed her determination. in early january, 1972, pat set out on an eight-day 10-,000 mile trip to the african continent. she visited many places. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william. the new preside
to this personally because now that i am an elected official the corley woman serving on that body and the first woman of color on that body's 102 year history. [applause] >> why does that matter? why is that relevant? i appreciate the applause, nothing to do with a personal achievement. it is the collective and shared victory for all of us. it means the solutions we are developing in government are more comprehensive and fully informed because of the different perspective so i thought a great deal about this issue of attraction and retention but more than that, how do we keep native bostonians? we were losing young people who were raised here and going somewhere else. they do come back and go on this pilgrimage to see what else is out there but they do come back. to the point about social venues this is an issue i am working on. we have 22 distinctive neighborhoods and is easy to be very siloed and what young professionals are looking for and what i was looking for and found when i went outside my campus community is community and human connections and restaurants are revolutionary in this way.
, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election. but there level of national security we are talking about here. it. >> now on booktv, as james hagerty of "the wall street journal" talks about the 1938 creation and 70 year history of the mortgage giant fannie mae. it's about an hour and 15. >> thank you all very much for being here and good afternoon. welcome to our book forum, "the fateful history of fannie mae," faithful not only for fannie mae but everybody else too and there are copies of the book on sale in the reception area, which we hope you will buy and which james hagerty will be happy to autograph after the program. i'm a resident fellow here at aei and we are very pleased to have you here to consider what this is fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae, i thought i knew a lot about the subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially about the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance
leaders to meet those challenges instead of just working to get elected by trying to appease one member of the party. [applause] that's what we need to do. we are 12, 13 million people in the shadows were not going to deport them. as a law-enforcement officer, you'll read in the book if he broke the law, we need to make sure you get penalized for breaking the law. but not taking any action, were neglecting the issue further. >> i often say that success is a process, not a reseller. many law-enforcement officers had the pleasure of meeting up for my life have all said many of the same things that hipolito as saying. the process is not working properly. the politicians aren't addressing this issue. you know, we need to take a long, hard on the slick as to what we are doing to help people, to help our brothers and sisters in mexico because if we don't do that, the problem or continue to grow and take over american cities and expand the inner-city. >> think we've got time for a couple more questions. >> i would like to ask you about how you evaluated the decision to write your book because
ronald reagan was elected in november 1966, j. edgar hoover and other fbi officials do this as a breath of fresh it. they believe they finally had an out in the governor's mansion, and begin to work closely with ronald reagan to crackdown on student protesters and radical professors. >> so what happened? >> well, what the documents show that over the following years, well, what happened first is that one of the first things reagan does after he is elected is to phone the fbi request this briefing, which hoover personally authorizes. two wks later at fst board of regents meeting, attended by ronald reagan, the board of regents votes to fire clark kerr. the boards balance in power had shifted because reagan was nine-member and he made several appointments to it. one of the fbi documents that was released indicates that the board members were aware of certain fbi information that ronald reagan had at the time. and in the following months and years, the documents show that the fbi continue to cooperate with reagan and to secretly provide him reports on certain professors and students, with
himself to be elected. one thing, he didn't give any speeches. he wrote his acceptance of the nomination and the one line in that message that caught the attention of the country was let us have peace. this was something that you electrified the south as well as the no.. in the period -- and battlefields of a different kind. congress was warring against the executive. who would govern? another question was who would govern in the south? would republican regime imposed upon the south by union troops, would they governed, will would the pre-war majority govern in the south? grant became something of a sympathetic figure. he was a good union general. he was the one who granted generous surrender terms to we's troops in appomattox believing upon the war's end they had to get back to the south which was starring as a result of the war and in no small part because of grant's strategy in places like georgia the south was starving. 11 take their horses to go back and plow their fields and treating them once again as fellow americans rather than rebels. when his troops began to cheer about the su
of the party that wins in a general election. the queen has a specific power under the constitution to be consulted and to encourage and to warn. she does that in all of her private audiences with the prime ministers and many other government officials, members of the clergy and members of the judiciary to come to her for completely confidential audiences which are extremely important to them. [inaudible question] >> well, the first constitution is so different from ours. underwritten, accumulation of laws and traditions. their subjects of the queen. that is what, you know, the term is. >> i need to ask, asking questions just temporarily, please stick around for more questions from the audience. c-span will be here shortly to continue. there will be taking questions year from that history and biography pavilion and also from national colors. please stay with us. we would love to have you continue. and if you have questions, we will be back with you in it slightly less than ten minutes. thanks so much for your patients. please stay with us, and please thank our author >> this book is
of the party that wins in a general election. the queen has specific powers under the constitution to be consulted and to encourage and to warren, and she does that in all of her private audiences with the prime ministers and many other government officials, members of the clergy, members of the judiciary who come to her for complete confidential audiences which are extremely important for them. [inaudible] >> the most important political title like it is under our system? >> the british constitution is so different from ours. it is an accumulation of laws and traditions and common-law over the years. there are subsets of the queen, that is what the term is. i need to ask that we cease asking questions temporarily. please the crowd for more questions from the audience. c-span will be here shortly to continue. they will be taking questions from the history and biography pavilion and also from national callers. please stay with us. we would love to have you
or the investment grade because of their low rating quality, low quality. we have an election two weeks from today in american voters have a clear choice that is going to vote for greater government support or are they going to let the private sector manage on its own? as an indicator, all we have to do is look at north dakota where it is 3% because of all the hater fracturing for oil and natural gas going on a privately held land. every state wants to be like north dakota. it is interesting that mitt romney would default the decisions as to whether to explore homeland or not to the individual states. he let each individual states decide. virginia for example that wants to look for oil off its coast would be allowed to do so. that permission was revoked by the obama administration even that was granted by the bush administration previously. everybody wants to get sources of energy in their states for not only to be able to get the jobs of getting it out, but attract criminal and manufacturing companies with low prices. so this is the choice we will have before us and to meet sees clearly the the w
of the court that she served on who it been in elective office. she had been majority majority leader of the heirs of the state senate and there is no one who has ever -- and for some of them that is a good thing. but it's kind of a narrowing of a professional biography and it's pretty interesting. what that reflects is the current state of our confirmation process i think. presidents don't want to take a chance and how do you not take a chance? someone who has already been acting as a judge and you get to look at how they performed as a judge in how they deal with legal material and how they comport themselves. it's a very rough -- for how they might behave on the u.s. supreme court and of course the lower courts are bound by supreme court precedent and they cannot sort of go off on their own. once you on the supreme court they all paid homage to this notion. you have heard stare decisis to stand by the president but it doesn't mean they have to. they can do whatever they can do to coddle up five votes to do. they are president bound lowers court judge doesn't necessarily get onto th
was fun. so to look at individuals whose change national policy those on elected and appointed once that created major legislation. >> host: what do teach? >> political science we almost always have been in the neighbor -- the number one they get a technical and others to i keep my finger in the american government course. we have a required course that said what goes on at the abell academy when ollie north does not understand the military? so the budget hearings required us of course, we don't talk about all of the sudan's but i like teaching the course. >> the idea to give a government check there is extra responsibilities. >> and also one more project, a book giveaway? >> one time one-shot that we have a load of fox we collected a bunch of books have never been paid per truckload to go to a landfill. so let's do another and another. we just passed five 5/6 billionth book. looked at the football field. side to side with and that is about to tractor to there and it is a library and a box. then we send items so some of the review books we dead and we believe we have the largest vol
right now with the election and some of your friends of mine and some of you will be. i just got married on the 12th. [applause] i have a book come out on tuesday called unlearning liberty censorship and the american debate and i am leaving right after this for my high school reunion, 20 of high school reunion. i'm here to talk about the book and how free speech is curtailed on the american campus and how this has harmed us all whether we are all on campus or not. so, why did i write this? i rode unlearning liberty because i went to law school, i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i had a russian father and a british mother and i came from that background realizing that the rule had to be that everybody got to say what they wanted to under the circumstances. the idea that, like, the government could understand what you said so it would be my mom or my dad in charge. in the general society free-speech said be the rule coming and i've always believed that. and so the history of the first amendment
territory. lincoln was elected in november of 1860, a month later united states congress came in to session. members of congress put forth various comprised portion. a critical portion of all in some dealt with the decision of the territory. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line west ward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now after this rather less than lengthy preface. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise which meant the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them all of you know know his name abraham lincoln what he was and what he did. the other two not so well known. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. probably few know of william henry in 1860 was a senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency, was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. finally, here i am. ready to start. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at bo
but in the beginning you have this theory romantic kind of relationship. even when his first elected to congress any rights or letters from his first trip abroad, the letters are filled with all these vision for this is what's going to happen when we come back. they have this wonderful nursery. i checked out the ship. we can take trisha down there. we look oco the site of europe. for years he promised to take her to europe. it didn't actually happen as a vacation until 1963. but he was so promising that he was going to happen. does that answer your question i ask you think we have time for just one work question. >> i'm curious to know a little bit about her family born in nevada. what did your father do their? why did he move to california? what were his parents late, her mother's parents late? >> okay, now we are getting into a tricky area. so her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had traveled around sn -- she had done a lot of different things. he would kind of talk to her about these adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and hermit there
in two years. it is enough already. i don't think it's the most important election. >> okay. right here. we will get the other questions. >> why aren't there more conservative playwrights? is there anything that can be done about that? is that just inherent to the human condition and the nature of playwriting? >> here is the thing. you cannot breed playwrights. you really can't. i knew him as a great, wonderful guy. he kept shaking down the state in the government and the rich people, anybody who would listen. a hamlet with eskimos. an all female cast. in the goddam thing. he didn't care. but that is not the place to politics. unfortunately contemporary theater comes out of the university system. a very fortunate. william peterson. we were all kids. twenty-two years old. we and our own theater company. we didn't know any better. but nowadays i think they're doing that on the internet, whatever the hell they do. but they study the theater and do theater in universities in the liberal arts universities, completely democratic -- democratic. they went from having an experience and a free-ma
that binder by a group of female advocates ahead of the election. by the other thing we've got to look at is women's resumes. if we're really going to of women in administered position and private sector, the public sector, we have to recognize that they are different, at least from my generation. there may be blind spots when you were raising her children, that's a very precious time. you know what's going on in your community. you volunteered. so a man looking at a resume will favor a resume that looks pretty much like his. as a woman, when i interviewed a woman who went to law school after she raised her kids, i immediately understood what that resume meant, even though she undersold herself in the interview. you can imagine she got the job. so if we're going to have women in places, we can't have authority, we can't always expect them to be just like men, even in their life story. and the question of qualify, they may be more qualified by having a slightly different resume that really has enriched their experience and let them do a better job. >> i heard a story, resource on tommy
. so just after nixon was elected, hunter sent a chatty letter to rosemary woods of nixon's secretary i guess you'd him a special field as housing and urban development. there are very few republicans in the field and even fewer who are or what to do be with in a lifeboat. out what i like is the indian. stay healthy. you are photographing well. [laughter] hunter was always a ladies and he loved to party. i can show you exclusively this is a party favor from a fannie mae party in that era. hunter bought new headquarters for fannie mae. some people said it was the sort of panelists that louis xiv would have built, if he had the money. now, during nixon's first year in office the fed was fighting inflation. interest rates went up, and housings starts came down 40%. nixon in january 1970 clarity there was a crisis situation in housing. part of the solution was more fannie mae. we got the emergency home finance act of 1970. it create a second government chartered mortgage company, freddie mac, designed to cater more to the s&l industry. and more important that allow both fannie and freddie t
is if romney is elected. [laughter] they might actually do what they say they will. [laughter] >> your best hope it is one of the candidates is lying through his teeth about his plans. [laughter] we sit now what you'll slide prolonged stagnation. you wrote a book on inequality. this could not be a positive development to have the reserve army of the unemployed to weaken the bargaining power. >> inequality has become a serious problem in the united states. we have been arguing and long time. even the economists realizes it is a serious problem. when they say at you have to believe that. [laughter] the magazine's not our colleague. [laughter] >> host: you take them on. the problem now is lack of demand and that means people of not buying as many goods that leads to unemployment. the people at the top save 15% of their income the people at the bottom spend everything they need to to get by. it lowers total aggregate demand. there is now a vicious cycle with the high and employment this year wages is brought down that in turn before the crisis the median income was not doing well is lower today
has been widely called the most presidential election of our lifetimes given that the choice between the two men running for office is very, very different. as we're in the final days, let me ask you this last question. do you see greater challenges facing cities, boston in the particular, under a mitt romney presidency as opposed to a continued barack obama presidency, and, ed, i'm going to start with you. >> i think the track record of the national government with cities is very, very weak, and i think that that's true under both parties. occasionally, very well meaning but weak, and occasionally not so well meaning but weak. and i think that's the larger challenge, how to create an urban agenda that actually makes sense. one that doesn't and, again, you know, this means pushing back on policies that mean massive spending on highways with general tax revenues. i mean, president obama's the most urban president we've had since ted key roosevelt in many -- teddy roosevelt in many ways. the latest highway bill, we had a mass infusion of general revenues instead of gas taxes to pay for
the november 2010 election when the republicans and the tea party really knocked barack obama for a loop and took control of the house and everything that happened after that. the tax cut deal, the big fight over the budget and the debt ceiling and deficit reduction, also what happened in egypt and libya. and so i'm looking at how obama made the decisions he made and why did the actions he took. and a very perilous time politically but also explain how this is all done in a way, set up a 2012 campaign that we
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)